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A woman takes a break from work to breathe. She is standing outside.

Breathwork to Release Anger & Frustration

Anger and frustration can hit us anytime during the day, leaving us feeling like a bull about to charge if we don’t have a way to counteract how the body responds to these types of emotions.

These strong and often overwhelming emotions can create tense muscles, shallow breathing, a racing heartbeat, and even increased blood pressure.

In short, letting these emotions control us for extended periods of time is not good.

We can actually look to the yogis and their breathwork practice to learn how to manage strong emotions to keep our cool and continue to enjoy our day when unexpected setbacks occur.

The best part about this breathwork? You can do it at any time of the day, anywhere you are, any time these emotions hit.

It’s No Surprise That There is More Anger & Frustration

With the global pandemic that continues to persist and impact our daily lives, there are many increased stressors for everyone.

The important thing is to not be hard on yourself if you find yourself struggling. Whether you are a stay-at-home mom at your wit’s end with homeschooling or a healthcare worker on the front lines, it’s okay to admit that things are hard and scary right now.

We must allow the energy to be released and recognize it to not stuff it down. Stuffing down anger can cause outbursts down the road and leads to all sorts of issues with our mind-body wellness.

Now whether you are upset that your roommate didn’t do the dishes, your unemployment check is late, your doctor is fully booked for three months, your pet accidentally chewed your favorite shoes, you didn’t get that job you really wanted, or someone shared an opinion that really got under your skin, this breathwork practice will help you regulate your emotions and help you to return to a more relaxed, calm space.

There Are Proven Techniques to Release Anger & Frustration

Breathing slowly helps to activate our parasympathetic nervous system, which gives us the experience of relaxation. Studies have also revealed that engaging in slow breathing daily can have a big impact over time.

You will start to train yourself to naturally respond to upsets with this deep breathing, so you will effectually begin self-regulating.

When you use the breath to signal the mind to stop its racing thoughts, it will act as if you’re getting ready to go to sleep and start to allow your body to switch out of fight or flight mode and into recuperation where you will not feel on edge.

The breathwork benefits of slow and deep diaphragmatic breathing will help your overall stress and anxiety lower, lower inflammation, improve sleep, strengthen your immune system, and have more level emotions.

You might also be interested in: Breathwork to Clear Doubt & Indecision

Breathwork to Release Anger & Frustration

Set your intention to release the anger and frustration you are feeling before beginning this breathwork practice. Moving the energy instead of ignoring the energy keeps your brain from triggering more tension to develop in the body.

This simple technique can be done three times daily for five minutes.

Step 1

Breathe in for four seconds and focus on what might be bringing you anger or frustration right now, whether it’s a person or a situation.

As you breathe in, feel the lower part of your lungs expand with air and puff out the lower ribs. Then feel the chest expand as you continue to breathe in and finally fill the top of the lungs.

You can do this while lying down or sitting at your office desk.

Step 2

Hold this focus of anger or frustration in your mind as you breathe in deeply. Then, breathe out for six seconds. Breathing out, follow the contraction of the lungs and finish by pulling the belly in towards the spine.

Imagine these emotions escaping your body and releasing into the air around you. You are cleansing and letting these emotions go.

Step 3

Breathe in again for four seconds, this time focusing on an item, person, or place that brings you joy.

Maybe it’s the beach at sunset, with soft waves crashing against the shore, or maybe it’s your beloved partner. Envision this place or person and imagine that the breathe you are allowing into your lungs is filled with the energy these things bring.

Step 4

Breathe out again for another six seconds any lingering anger or frustration you might be feeling.

Continue these steps for at least five minutes, or as long as you need to regain some peace.

Tips to Improve Your Breathwork

Breathe only through the nose and try to constrict the back of the throat slightly, making it easier to lengthen the breath. This is called ujjayi breathing and is used in hatha and vinyasa yoga.

The soothing sound of this breathing adds to the relaxing effect of your breathing technique. It also allows you to take deeper breaths, and the more oxygen you get, the better you will feel.

Write down this breathing technique on a notecard and put it in a velvet or suede pouch with a calming essential oil (such as lavender) and crystal (such as amethyst).

When you feel anger or frustration kicking in, try holding the crystal or stick it in your pocket. Then dab the essential oil on your temples and wrists and do your five minutes of breathing.

We are confident that this breathwork exercise can help you when you need it the most. Times are tough, but you are tougher!

Related article: Breathwork to Handle Major Life Changes

Shannon Yrizarry

Shannon Yrizarry

Trusting her intuition has brought Shannon a wealth of gifts and she brings this wisdom to Daily Life … daily! Instead of following the "norms" of career development, Shannon followed her gut. It's led her to some extraordinary places and experiences as a healer, clairvoyant, metaphysical teacher and Kundalini yoga instructor.... Read More

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